A greater modulation of the visual and fronto-parietal networks for children in a post-media versus pre-media exposure group

Rola Farah, George Shchupak, Scott Holland, John Hutton, Jonathan Dudley, Mark DiFrancesco, Mekibib Altaye, Tzipi Horowitz-Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Media use in children has exploded in the past several decades, most recently fuelled by portable electronic devices. This study aims to explore differences in functional brain connectivity in children during a story-listening functional MRI (fMRI) task using data collected before (1998) and after (2013) the widespread adoption of media. Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected from English-speaking 5- to 7-year-old children at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, USA, of a functional MRI narrative comprehension task completed in 1998 (n = 22) or 2013 (n = 25). Imaging data were processed using a graph theory approach, focusing on executive functions, language and visual processing networks supporting reading. Results: Group differences suggest more efficient processing in the fronto-parietal network in the pre-media group while listening to stories. A modulation of the visual and fronto-parietal networks for the post-media exposure group was found. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to assess effects over time in the more exposed group to discern a causal effect of portable devices on cognitive networks.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • child development
  • executive functions
  • functional connectivity
  • global efficiency
  • narrative comprehension
  • screen exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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