An executive-functions-based reading training enhances sensory-motor systems integration during reading fluency in children with dyslexia

Rola Farah, Ally Dworetsky, Rebecca S. Coalson, Steven E. Petersen, Bradley L. Schlaggar, Keri S. Rosch, Tzipi Horowitz-Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Simple View of Reading model suggests that intact language processing and word decoding lead to proficient reading comprehension, with recent studies pointing at executive functions as an important component contributing to reading proficiency. Here, we aimed to determine the underlying mechanism(s) for these changes. Participants include 120 8- to 12-year-old children (n = 55 with dyslexia, n = 65 typical readers) trained on an executive functions-based reading program, including pre/postfunctional MRI and behavioral data collection. Across groups, improved word reading was related to stronger functional connections within executive functions and sensory networks. In children with dyslexia, faster and more accurate word reading was related to stronger functional connections within and between sensory networks. These results suggest greater synchronization of brain systems after the intervention, consistent with the "neural noise" hypothesis in children with dyslexia and support the consideration of including executive functions as part of the Simple View of Reading model.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2024

Keywords

  • dyslexia
  • executive functions
  • functional connectivity
  • intervention
  • neural noise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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